Fight the stigma, Start here!

Learn more about dementia, and how it affects all of us.

What do you know about dementia?

What if it is wrong? Let's find out.

How many people do you think are diagnosed with dementia in Canada?  Hover over or click on the orange boxes to reveal an answer.

More than 50,000

Wrong Answer

Hover over another box to reveal an answer

More than 250,000

Wrong Answer

Hover over another box to reveal an answer

More than 500,000

Correct!

More than 500,000 Canadians are diagnosed with dementia.

Did you know?

13,000 Canadians are diagnosed with dementia each year

Estimates of the prevalence of dementia in Canada vary. According to a 2012 study commissioned by the Alzheimer’s Society of Canada, 747,000 Canadians were living with cognitive impairment, which included, but was not limited to, dementia. In a 2010 report, the estimated prevalence of dementia alone was 500,000, based on previous studies in Canada and Europe. - (stat Canada)

Common stigmas & why we must fight them

From simple misconceptions to real harm

Estimates of the prevalence of dementia in Canada vary. According to a 2012 study commissioned by the Alzheimer’s Society of Canada, 747,000 Canadians were living with cognitive impairment, which included, but was not limited to, dementia. In a 2010 report, the estimated prevalence of dementia alone was 500,000, based on previous studies in Canada and Europe. - (stat Canada)

A diagnosis of dementia means life is over.

Reality: Many people with dementia live meaningful, active lives for a number of years. Some put their energy into public speaking and advocacy to help reduce the stigma that many people with dementia experience.

All people who have dementia become violent and aggressive.

Reality: Dementia affects each person differently. Issues with memory and with understanding what is happening around them as well as how people interact with people with dementia or how how they experience the social and physical environment around them can cause distress for some people with dementia. People with dementia can express their distress or frustration in many different ways, through their body language and in their actions. Taking steps to make the environment as comfortable and calming as possible can avoid many upsetting situations for both the person with dementia and people nearby.

Group of people standing and discussing ideas with each other.

Dementia only affects older people.

Reality: While most people with dementia are over the age of 65; a small number of people in their 40’s and 50’s can and do develop dementia. While most people do not develop dementia as they age, many do and need support and acceptance from friends, family and their health care team.

Dementia puts an end to social life

Reality: Many people with dementia continue to live meaningful lives; they continue to engage in activities they enjoyed in the past with family and friends, and very often also pursue new activities and friendships.

Dementia stigma is a real threat

Stigma limits the ability to live well

Estimates of the prevalence of dementia in Canada vary. According to a 2012 study commissioned by the Alzheimer’s Society of Canada, 747,000 Canadians were living with cognitive impairment, which included, but was not limited to, dementia. In a 2010 report, the estimated prevalence of dementia alone was 500,000, based on previous studies in Canada and Europe. - (stat Canada)

I have dementia,

#iamnotdementia

Change your view - You can help too!

Even if you don't know anyone affected by dementia.

Estimates of the prevalence of dementia in Canada vary. According to a 2012 study commissioned by the Alzheimer’s Society of Canada, 747,000 Canadians were living with cognitive impairment, which included, but was not limited to, dementia. In a 2010 report, the estimated prevalence of dementia alone was 500,000, based on previous studies in Canada and Europe. - (stat Canada)

  • Get informed

    First step to make a difference is to get informed about dementia.
    Learn the facts surrounding dementia, understand how it affects the people living with it and the people around them.

  • Be mindful

    Words have power and meaning. Stay positive.
    Be mindful of the words you use when describing a person and their adversities in life.

  • Be kind

    Your actions have a more permanent effect then you think.
    People living with dementia should be treated with the care and respect you would expect for yourself.
    Be supportive. Be respectful. Be a friend. Just being there for people can brighten their lives.

  • Speak up!

    Share your knowledge with your friends, family and even co-workers.
    A simple conversation can shine light on dementia and help everyone understand it better.
    Also don’t be afraid to speak up if you hear anybody making false or inaccurate remarks about dementia, make a polite correction.
    Change their view!